• Baby Pizotes Join the Refuge Family

    Bonnie and Clyde will stay at Refuge for Wildlife until they are old enough to be released back into the jungle.

    Bonnie and Clyde will stay at Refuge for Wildlife until they are old enough to be released back into the jungle.

     

    Here at Refuge for Wildlife our speciality is howler monkeys. Several are injured, electrocuted or orphaned each month, so the Refuge is filled with monkeys; we have at least 30 at all times. In addition to our specialty, we also rescue, rehabilitate and release other wild animals – from bats and owls to opossums and porcupines – we’ve seen it all!

    On April 23rd 2015, we rescued two absolutely adorable baby pizotes (otherwise known as coati). Local resident, Kristen Brousseau came across one of the babies in the road on the San Juan mountain and unfortunately there were several other babies in a nearby drainage ditch that had died. It appeared that they had fallen from a nest that was disturbed by repairs done to fix erosion of the roadside.  The mother was nearby with another baby so Kristen left to give the mother space to collect the baby. Kristen notified us here at Refuge for Wildlife and agreed to check on the babies later that day. With the mother nearby, we had hoped she would come to collect her lost baby and take her to safety. An abandoned baby animal is at risk of being hit by cars or eaten by birds of prey, snakes, and even ants.

    Unfortunately, later that day when Kristen retuned, the mother had abandoned the two baby pizotes that survived the fall. They were very dehydrated, but otherwise in good health. After a quick call to Refuge for Wildlife, we rescued one male and one female pizote who we have named Bonnie and Clyde. Both babies are doing great, enjoy sleeping on hot water bottles and are learning how to drink milk from syringes.

    Clyde is starting to get the hang of drinking his milk from a syringe.

    Clyde is starting to get the hang of drinking his milk from a syringe.

    Similar in size, shape and behavior to a common raccoon, pizotes can often be found rummaging through compost heaps and they are well-known for their cute “squeaky” chirping noises when they’re foraging in the jungle. Quite often you can hear what sounds like a doggie chew toy up in a tree, but it’s actually a pizote! Check out the attached video of one of our volunteers feeding the babies – when Bonnie is waiting her turn to be fed, she starts to make some unbelievably cute and unique noises!

    Once Bonnie and Clyde are old enough, and learn to forage for food on their own, they will be released back into the jungle where they belong. Here at Refuge for Wildlife, we rescue, rehabilitate and RELEASE!

     

     


     

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